Comparing the lifestyles of victims: A routine activity theory assessment of repeat victimization in Canada

  • Zavin Nazaretian Adrian College, Adrian, MI, USA.
  • Chivon Fitch University of Tampa, Tampa, FL, USA.
Keywords: Social status, LGBT

Abstract

This paper simultaneously explores the relationship between social status, routine activity theory, and repeat victimization. This study compares the effects of lifestyle with key social status variables like gender, race, and sexuality, on varying degrees of victimization to answer the question: do routine activities or social status predict repeat victimization? This research is a secondary data analysis using two waves of the Canadian Victimization Survey from 2004 and 2009. Both a logistic regression and multinomial logistic regression are used to analyze the possible causes of repeat victimization. Overall, social status is influenced by lifestyle when predicting victimization; however, key social status variables predict high levels of victimization such as identifying as gay or lesbian or being an Aboriginal Canadian. The most powerful indicator of victimization was if a victim had been previously arrested themselves. The results of this study suggest that, while lifestyle is a strong predictor of victimization, minority groups are still at risk of being victimized at higher levels.

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Published
2021-06-16
How to Cite
Nazaretian, Z., & Fitch, C. (2021). Comparing the lifestyles of victims: A routine activity theory assessment of repeat victimization in Canada. Journal of Community Safety and Well-Being, 6(2), 56-65. https://doi.org/10.35502/jcswb.181
Section
Original Research