Police De-Escalation Training & Education: Nationally, Provincially, and Municipally

This article is related directly to the 6th International Law Enforcement & Public Health (LEPH) Virtual Conference in March 2021.

  • Lisa Deveau Department of Social Work, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada.

Abstract

In this critical review and social innovation narrative, the current literature on de-escalation and policing is reviewed. The following explores how services train recruits and experienced officers on de-escalation, conflict resolution, and crisis intervention skills. A limited environmental scan was completed to inquire about the number of hours dedicated to de-escalation training compared with tactical and combative training within Ontario law enforcement agencies. The environmental scan also considered how services respond to imminent mental heath crises, as some services rely on mental health professionals to respond to 911 emergencies with police officers, through the Mobile Crisis Team. Within the literature, questions are proposed about the government’s role in overseeing policing, and why there fails to be any federally or provincially mandated training and approach to mental health and de-escalation within Canadian law enforcement. The author ultimately advocates for systemic change by highlighting the priorities, values, and contradictions within Canadian police services which have been influenced by colonization and patriarchal narratives.

Article Views

Download data is not yet available.
Published
2021-03-19
How to Cite
Deveau, L. (2021). Police De-Escalation Training & Education: Nationally, Provincially, and Municipally: This article is related directly to the 6th International Law Enforcement & Public Health (LEPH) Virtual Conference in March 2021. Journal of Community Safety and Well-Being, 6(1), 2-5. https://doi.org/10.35502/jcswb.183
Section
Reviews