Universal precautions: A methodology for trauma-informed justice

This article is related directly to the 6th International Law Enforcement & Public Health (LEPH) Virtual Conference in March 2021.

  • Daniel J. Jones The University of Huddersfield/Edmonton Police Service, Edmonton, AB, Canada
Keywords: Trauma Informed, Police, Justice System, Victim Offender Overlap

Abstract

The research clearly indicates that the vast majority of individuals involved in the justice system who display offending behaviour have experienced trauma, victimization, or Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Knowing this to be empirically factual raises the question, why is this not highlighted in the training of police officers, correctional officers, parole and probation officers, crown prosecutors, defence lawyers, and judges alike? An understanding of the Justice Client and their complex trauma could have important consequences on how all justice actors interact with people who experience the justice system. Knowing that these individuals were often victims long before they were offending could bring a more compassionate lens to the justice system. Having traumatic experiences is not the cause of offending, but it is often present in the offending population. The prevalence of trauma among the offending population, who themselves have often traumatized their victims, suggests a much-needed change in how police are trained to interact with Justice Clients. This paper applies the concept of Universal Precautions from first aid training in the development of practical policy to create a justice system based in compassion.

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Author Biography

Daniel J. Jones, The University of Huddersfield/Edmonton Police Service, Edmonton, AB, Canada

Daniel J Jones has worked in the justice system for 26 years. He spent 3 years as a correctional officer and 23 years as a police officer obtaining the rank of Inspector. Daniel earned his Master’s Degree at the University of Cambridge in Applied Criminology receiving the Wakefield Scholarship. He is currently a PhD Candidate at the University of Huddersfield where he received the Secure Societies Institute Scholarship. Daniel is working in collaboration with the University of Alberta on the University of Alberta Prison Project. Daniel is also a sessional instructor at the University of Alberta in the Sociology Department. His focus of study is the Victim-Offender overlap and looking at how research and evidence based practice can create positive systems change.

Published
2021-09-17
How to Cite
Jones, D. J. (2021). Universal precautions: A methodology for trauma-informed justice: This article is related directly to the 6th International Law Enforcement & Public Health (LEPH) Virtual Conference in March 2021. Journal of Community Safety and Well-Being, 6(3), 156-159. https://doi.org/10.35502/jcswb.194
Section
Social Innovation Narratives