The effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on domestic violence and child abuse

This article is related directly to the 6th International Law Enforcement & Public Health (LEPH) Virtual Conference in March 2021.

  • Sandra M. Bucerius University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
  • Brad W.R. Roberts University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
  • Daniel J. Jones Huddersfield University, Huddersfield, United Kingdom/Edmonton Police Service, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Keywords: Policing, quarantine, lockdown, abuse, children, violence

Abstract

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many governments around the world have implemented lockdown or mass quarantine measures. While the purpose of these measures is to prevent the spread of the virus, they have had important social consequences. To determine the effect that pandemic-related isolation and quarantine measures have had on domestic violence and child abuse, we analyzed Canadian police calls for service data from 2015 to 2020. Our findings indicate that calls for service related to both domestic violence and child abuse have significantly increased during the pandemic. In light of these findings, we make recommendations for both government officials responsible for pandemic management and policing organizations on how to prevent increases in domestic violence and child abuse during future lockdowns.

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Author Biography

Daniel J. Jones, Huddersfield University, Huddersfield, United Kingdom/Edmonton Police Service, Edmonton, AB, Canada.

Daniel J Jones has worked in the justice system for 26 years. He spent 3 years as a correctional officer and 23 years as a police officer obtaining the rank of Inspector. Daniel earned his Master’s Degree at the University of Cambridge in Applied Criminology receiving the Wakefield Scholarship. He is currently a PhD Candidate at the University of Huddersfield where he received the Secure Societies Institute Scholarship. Daniel is working in collaboration with the University of Alberta on the University of Alberta Prison Project. Daniel is also a sessional instructor at the University of Alberta in the Sociology Department. His focus of study is the Victim-Offender overlap and looking at how research and evidence based practice can create positive systems change.

Published
2021-06-16
How to Cite
Bucerius, S. M., Roberts, B. W., & Jones, D. J. (2021). The effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on domestic violence and child abuse: This article is related directly to the 6th International Law Enforcement & Public Health (LEPH) Virtual Conference in March 2021. Journal of Community Safety and Well-Being, 6(2), 75-79. https://doi.org/10.35502/jcswb.204
Section
Original Research